Linguistics

I received a Ph.D. in Linguistics from the University of Pennsylvania in May 2015.
I also have a M.A. in Computational Linguistics from Brandeis University (2009) and a B.A. in Linguistics from Harvard (2007).

My specialty is phonology, morphology, and the morphology-phonology interface.
I also do experimental work in psycholinguistics and neurolinguistics, and have additional interest in computational linguistics, historical linguistics, and sociolinguistics.

Download my academic CV: Shwayder.CV.Jan2017.pdf

Download my dissertation: Shwayder-WordsSubwords.pdf

Experimental Interests:

I am interested in the morphological processing of neurotypical and autistic brains. Some current studies I am working on involve looking at brain response and reaction time differences in, for example, repetition priming, words vs. non-words, switching speakers, and acoustically modified stimuli.
See The Embick Lab at Penn and Tim Roberts' lab at CHOP.

Theoretical Interests:

Morphosyntax–Phonology Interface

I am particularly interested in the relationship between morphosyntactic structure and phonological domains. My recent work has focused on the word level and what it means to be a word both morphosyntactically and phonologically. These two sides of the word (morphological and phonological) match up much of the time, but the interesting cases are when they do not.

Examples:

Contextually Determined Affixation of Clitics (Submitted to Morphology)

‣ Words and Subwords: Phonology in a Piece-Based Syntactic Morphology (Dissertation, UPenn, defended April 2015)

            Supervisor: David Embick        Committee Members: Eugene Buckley and Rolf Noyer

‣ Morphosyntactic Structure of Phonological Words (Annual Meetings of Phonology 2014)

Morphophonological Structure and Variation

In joint work with the sociolinguists at Penn, I examine interesting cases where the structure of the morphology-phonology interface interacts with variation and variable-rule phonology.

Examples:


Computational Modeling of Morphology and Phonology

I use my computational linguistics training by employing algorithmic thinking when approaching morphology and phonology. Sometimes this leads to explicit modeling of morphological or phonological processes.

Examples:

‣ A theoretically informed morphological learner [poster] (MASC-SLL 2013; Joint work with H. Akiva Bacovcin) – also see code on Github

Native American Languages

Native American languages contain a wide range of morphological and phonological phenomena. As such, I find them to be an excellent testing ground for theories of morphology and phonology.

Examples:

‣ Research Assistant for Kashaya Dictionary and Database Project, P.I. Eugene Buckley

‣ Against a split phonology of Michif (PWPL 20.1; Joint work with Hilary Prichard)